Discover All About Carduelis, Family Fringillidae

The Carduelis is found in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. It has been introduced in Brazil, Australia, New Zealand and the Azores. It lives in orchards and all other cultivated places. In the fall, he forages for thistles on moors, roads and other open spaces. Its flight is made of short waves.

Carduelis Carduelis

  • Appearance: Small, colorful and bright finch with characteristic yellow wings and a white rump. The adult’s head is marked with red, white and black spots. Wing and tail feathers have white tips.
  • Dimensions: length 12 to 13.5 centimeters, weight 15 to 19.5 grams.
  • Nest: In a tree, well hidden and generally high up (1 to 11 m). Bowl-shaped, made with lichen, roots, thread, spider web and lined with soft wood and hair.
  • Reproduction: 4 to 6 eggs laid in April-May, incubated by the female for 11 to 13 days. Chicks leave the nest after 12 to 16 days.
  • Distribution: present on farms and inhabited areas, especially in southern Finland, but its sparse distribution extends to northern regions. The Finnish breeding population is estimated at 10,000-20,000 pairs.
  • Migration: diurnal Most birds leave Finland in October-November, returning in March-April. The main wintering areas are in southern Scandinavia and central Europe, although some birds winter in Finland.
  • Food: Seeds of wild plants, including burdock and thistles. (See Article: Goldfinch Bird)

Carduelis Chloris

  • Appearance: Common chaffinch and quite large in characteristic greenish color. Body, head and thick bill. It is distinguished mainly by the yellow edge of its tail and its outermost yellow wing feathers.
  • Dimensions: length 14 to 16 centimeters, weight 25 to 35 grams.
  • Nest: in a tree or shrub with dense foliage at a height of 1 to 5 meters (sometimes up to 12 meters). Made of dry branches, moss, roots and stems of plants, lined with buds, hair, feathers and weed seeds.
  • Reproduction: 3 to 7 eggs laid in March-April, covered by the female for 13 to 14 days. Chicks leave the nest after 18 days. Pup often 2 to 3 litters.
  • Distribution: breeds today in northern northern Lapland, especially in inhabited areas and agricultural land. The Finnish breeding population is estimated at 300,000 pairs. It has become more common as people feed it in winter.
  • Migration: diurnal Many birds also winter in Finland. Migrants take flight in September-November, returning in March-April after wintering in western Europe.
  • Food: Wildflower seeds and roses. Common visitor to garden feeders. (See Article: Golden Goldfinch)

Carduelis Cpinus

  • Appearance: small yellow, green and black finch. Yellow is present mainly on the head, breast, wings, rump and tail edge (similar to the tail markings of the verdier). The flanks are marked with characteristic dark stripes.
  • Dimensions: length 11 to 12.5 centimeters, weight 10 to 15 grams.
  • Nest: usually in a spruce tree, on a branch distant from the trunk at a height of 1.5-20 meters. Made of spruce twigs, lichen, spruce bark, grass and spider web, lined with root hairs and fibers.
  • Reproduction: 4 to 6 eggs laid in April, raised by the female for 11 to 14 days. Chicks leave the nest after 15 days. Pairs often raise a second brood in June-July.
  • Distribution: breeds in mixed and coniferous forests. Absent only in the treeless uplands of Lapland. Finnish breeding population estimated at 700 000-2 000 000 000 pairs.Numbers vary considerably depending on the availability of spruce seed.
  • Migration: diurnal Autumn migration in September-October, return in March-May. Winter in western and central Europe, as well as throughout the Mediterranean. Variable numbers of alder siskins also winter in Finland.
  • Diet: mainly spruce and fir seeds, in autumn and winter also alder and birch seeds. Also feeds on dandelions and thistles in summer. Visit garden feeders often.

Carduelis Cannabina

  • Appearance: small, elongated, dark finch on cultivated ground. Cinnamon in all liveries, beige stripes on throat a little darker. Wings lined with white feathers and prominent on the tail.
  • Dimensions: length 12.5 to 14 centimeters, weight 15 to 21 grams.
  • Nest: nest built at low altitude, 0 to 4 m in trees or bushes with dense foliage or sometimes on the ground. Made with twigs, roots, pieces of bark and dry grass, carpeted with down, hair, thread, and cottony plant material, etc.
  • Reproduction: Pond 2 to 6 eggs in April. Females breed for 11 to 14 days. Chicks remain in the nest for more than 14 days.
  • Distribution: occurs in cultivated land and peri-urban areas of southern and central Finland. The Finnish breeding population is estimated at 10,000-20,000 pairs.
  • Migration: diurnal migrant, heading south in September-October, returning in March-May. Winters in western and central Europe or around the Mediterranean. May occasionally winter in Finland.
  • Food: Seeds of wild plants.

Carduelis Flammea

  • Dimensions: length 11.5 to 14 centimeters, weight 12 to 16 grams.
  • Nest: in a tree or bush at a height of 0 to 4 meters. Carefully made using twigs, with an intermediate layer of lichen, fine roots, juniper bark fragments, and others, and lined with willow buds, reindeer hair and feathers.
  • Reproduction: 3 to 7 eggs incubated by the female for 10-12 days. Chicks leave the nest after 12 to 13 days. May be observed anytime from April to the end of July. Some pairs raise two litters.
  • Distribution: boreal conifer species also present in birch forests of arctic lands. Especially abundant in northern Finland, but sometimes breeds in the south. The Finnish breeding population is estimated at 200 000-500 000 pairs. Groups form where birds feed in certain winters.
  • Migration: partial migrant that may wander and invade behavior during winter. Mostly moves in October-November, with return migration occurring in March-April. Winter in southern and central Russia, as well as Finland.
  • Diet: seeds of different plants; in winter, mainly alder and birch.

Carduelis tristis

  • Lives in North America (Canada, USA to Mexico).
  • There are 4 subspecies. The wintering bird in the southernmost regions of this area. That is, in a line from California to Florida and Mexico.
  • Depending on the subspecies, the size varies from 11.5 to 13 centimeters for a weight ranging from 11 to 20 grams.

Carduelis Cucullata

  • Common name: Venezuelan red eurasian
  • Size: 10 to 15 centimeters
  • Weight: 10 to 14 grams
  • Longevity: 10 years
  • Distribution: the geographical area of origin is in the north of South America. This red siskin lives in Venezuela, of course, but can also meet the British and some neighboring islands.

Carduelis Magellanica

  • There are 11 subspecies of Magellan Magellan distributed throughout its range.
  • They differ in size from 10 to 14 centimeters
  • color: yellowish green with more or less green or yellow, more or less marked wings and size of the cap.
  • The nominal form and 4 subspecies are present in Argentina.

Carduelis Psaltria

  • It is also known as the jilgero or Mexican Siskin.
  • It is a very contrasted bird. Glossy black on the back, intense yellow on the underside. As if it had been cut lengthwise to paint it in 2 colors.
  • It is an American that can be found in the United States, Central America and northern South America (Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru). He is also present in Cuba.
  • There are 5 subspecies.
  • It measures 10 centimeters.
  • It lives in areas covered with shrubs and bushes, near ponds, at the edge of forests, in parks, gardens and crops.
  • It travels in pairs or small bands and flies long distances on bare ground. He is stationed in sight on a branch to sing.
  • Its flight is undulating.
  • It looks for food on the ground or in bushes. This consists of seeds that it finds on the ground, in the bushes. Insects are not excluded.

Carduelis Atrata

  • The black goldfinch is a small passerine of 13 to 15 centimeters, which belongs to the family Fringillidae.
  • It is a bird that lives in the desert area of the Puna, the Andes Mountains, in northwestern Argentina, from Jujuy to the Mendoza region.
  • In general, the plumage is black. The wing mirror is bright yellow, as are the caudal coverts and abdomen.
  • The bill, eyes, legs and toes are black.
  • In the nuptial period, or when defending its territory, the male has the particularity of being able to slightly trim the feathers of the head, which then form a slight crest.

Carduelis Xanthogastra

  • Lives in Costa Rica, Panama, northern Venezuela and Colombia, southwest of the equator and northern Bolivia.
  • The yellow-tailed siskin is an inhabitant of tropical and subtropical forests.
  • It is observed in clearings and meadows.
  • Accustomed to the altitude insofar as it can be observed between 1500 and 2500 meters.
  • The male is black, with yellow wing mirrors. The belly is yellow and the edges of the rectrices.
  • The female, on the other hand, has a dull olive green plumage.
  • The belly is greenish yellow. The rear-view mirrors are present but are less bright.<br

Carduelis notata

  • Size: 12 centimeters
  • weight: 11 to 15 grams
  • this bird lives in the high areas of the subtropics, rarely changing altitude during the breeding season, except in Guatemala.
  • It frequents forests of large conifers and oaks, as well as cloud forests or secondary forests located mainly between 1000 and 2750 meters above sea level.
  • In eastern Guatemala and locally in some other areas, the goldfinch is found in low pine forests or in open savannahs with scattered pine forests near sea level.
  • It is a bird endemic to Central America.
  • The sexes are different. In the adult male, the entire head to the nape of the neck, chin, throat and upper breast are black.
  • Black intake can vary and sometimes extend to the middle of the chest.
  • The underside of the neck and back of the head have a dull yellow color.
  • The fur, back and scapulars are olive green, shaded yellow or with black feather bases.
  • The upperparts become bright yellow in the rump area. The upper coverts are black, as well as the tail which has two bright yellow triangular spots on the mid-length edges.
  • Medium and large mantas, alula and mantas primaries are black. The flight plumage are also black, marked bright yellow on the base of primary and slightly on the base of the second outermost, forming a visible wing point.

Carduelis Citrinella

  • Size: 12 centimeters
  • Length: 22 centimeters
  • Weight: 11 to 14 grams
  • Slightly larger than Serin Cini , this unshredded bird has a relatively long bill and tail.
  • The adult male has a deep yellow underparts and a yellowish-green upperparts with blackish wings and clearly visible yellow wing bars.
  • The rump is yellowish, but the most remarkable character is undoubtedly the bluish-gray head and sides of the breast that contrast with the yellowish chin and forehead.
  • Frequents montane forests from about 700 meters above sea level to tree line, often in spruce stands with clearings near pastures.
  • Fairly common at the edge of upland coniferous forests, on rocky slopes dotted with spruce and scrub. It comes down lower in winter.
  • Consumes a wide variety of seeds and is sometimes seen perching acrobatically on grass stems, but also pecking the ground in grasses.
  • In the latter case, it shows a very docile behavior, letting the observer approach at almost two meters, without noticing it as it is busy pecking.
  • The mountain venturon also consumes insects. (See Article: Yellow-rumped Goldfinch)

Carduelis Cabaret

  • The two subspecies of redpolls are found in southern Scandinavia. Individuals are of European plumage and have been collected from October to February and April.
  • The subspecies Cabaret breeds on the Norwegian coast inland in the neighboring departments of the Oslo Fjord.
  • While the Flammea are nesting in the mountains or at a certain altitude, such as on the peat plateau.
  • This redpoll is rare in Oslo during the breeding season when the cabaret subspecies is more common.
  • Both subspecies are wintering around the Oslo fjord.
  • The plums collected include a variety of plumage and identification of both subspecies is quite delicate.Some flammea juveniles may present large mantas as brown as in cabaret
  • Identification between the two subspecies is generally based on plumage criteria, tonality of the upperparts, flanks, head and cheeks.
  • In the cabaret, the large secondary and tertiary coverts are markedly browner than in flammea
  • These criteria are much more accentuated in the juvenile cabaret

Carduelis Barbata

  • The black-chinned goldfinch is a small passerine of 12 to 13 centimeters, belonging to the family Fringillidae.
  • It is present in the southern third of Argentina and the Falkland Islands.
  • In the summer it is often found along the Andes Mountains, from 1500 meters above sea level, from Neuquén to Tierra del Fuego.
  • The male has a black top of the head and throat. The neck and back are greenish yellow with black stripes.
  • The belly, the belly are bright yellow and the rump is whitish.
  • The wings are black with yellow bands, the tail feathers are black with yellow edges.
  • The bill is relatively large and gray. The legs are dark gray and the eyes are black.
  • The female has a gray head.
  • Its diet consists mainly of seeds, especially thistle seeds.
  • He delicately places his ears, herbs and flowering thistles to take them with his beak.
  • Nesting takes place between September and December. The female builds her nest in the fork of a low tree branch or even on the ground in the grasses. The cup-shaped nest is made of plant fibers and moss.

 

Carduelis Pinus

  • Length: 13 centimeters approximately 23 centimeters
  • The back is brown, with dark brown stripes, almost black.
  • The flanks are white with brown stripes.
  • The eye is black. The bead is long and pointed.
  • The male has yellow on the wings and sides of the tail, but not the female. Yellow may be less present for some individuals, including males.
  • It lives mainly in the forests. Present throughout the province of Quebec south of James Bay.
  • Habitates in the boreal forest, temperate, in areas of artificial land, plantations, rural gardens.

Carduelis hornemanni

  • Appearance: Similar to the sizerin, but lighter. The best distinguishing features to identify it are a light patch without streaking on the rump, the uniformly light-colored cloaca, the very small bill, and a generally lighter appearance than the sizerin linnet.
  • Size: Length 12-14 centimeters
  • Weight 12-16 grams.
  • Nest: In a tree or bush, usually very low. Carefully constructed, with an outer layer of twigs, an intermediate layer of lichens, juniper bark fragments, thin root fibers, among others, and is lined with willow shoots, reindeer hairs and feathers.
  • Reproduction: It lays 3 to 7 eggs from May to July, incubated by the female for 10 to 12 days. Chicks remain in the nest for 12 to 13 days.
  • Distribution: Breeds in tundra regions and mountain birch grasslands. The Finnish population is estimated at 1,000-5,000 pairs. The number of birds probably varies considerably from year to year. Commonly seen at bird feeders.
  • Migration: Partially migratory, with irregular movement and migratory patterns. Fall season movements occur especially in November; spring migration is from March to April.Some birds winter in Finnish Lapland, but the species is also commonly seen in southern Finland, although it does not migrate as far south as the Sizerin linnet.
  • Food: Seeds of various plants, particularly alder and birch in winter. (See Article: Albino Goldfinch)

Carduelis Carduelis

  • Appearance: Small, colorful and bright finch with characteristic yellow wings and a white rump. The adult’s head is marked with red, white and black spots. Its wing and tail feathers have white tips.
  • Dimensions: length 12 to 13,5 centimeters
  • weight 15 to 19,5 grams
  • Nest: In a tree, well hidden and generally high up (1 to 11 meters). Bowl-shaped, made with lichen, roots, thread, spider web and lined with soft wood and hair.
  • Reproduction: 4 to 6 eggs laid in April-May, incubated by the female for 11 to 13 days. Chicks leave the nest after 12 to 16 days.
  • Distribution: present on farms and inhabited areas, especially in southern Finland, but its sparse distribution extends to northern regions. The Finnish breeding population is estimated at 10,000-20,000 pairs.
  • Migration: diurnal Most birds leave Finland in October-November, returning in March-April.The main wintering areas are in southern Scandinavia and central Europe, although some birds winter in Finland.
  • Food: Seeds of wild plants, including burdock and thistles.

Carpodacus erythrinus

  • Appearance: Medium-sized finch with fairly uniform plumage. The male is easily distinguished by its red head, breast and rump. Females and juveniles are light brown. Short and robust beak with curved upper edge. Eyes curious, small and dark.
  • Dimensions: length 13.5 to 15 centimeters
  • weight 21 to 26 grams
  • Nest: in a bush or tree, made with dry grass stems protruding from the nest and dried meadow flowers, lined with root fibers and hair.
  • Reproduction: 4 to 6 eggs laid from May to June, raised by the female for 11 to 13 days. Chicks hatch 10 to 15 days after hatching.
  • Distribution: Breeds in thickets, farmland and gardens from southern Finland to Lapland. Populations are densest in southern Finland. The Finnish breeding population is estimated at 250,000-350,000 pairs.
  • Migration: mostly nocturnal. Leaves Finland from July to August and returns from May to June. Winters in Southeast Asia.
  • Food: seeds, shoots, insects.

Pyrrhula Pyrrhula

  • Appearance: Chaffinch often seen in gardens in winter. Strong, thick bill Both sexes have a black cap. Underneath, pinkish red in male, pinkish gray in female. Large characteristic white wing streak.
  • Dimensions: Length 15.5 to 17.5 centimeters
  • weight 24 to 38 grams
  • Nest: usually in a low bush at a height between 0.5 and 5 meters. Made with small dry twigs, lined with fine root fibers and bristles.
  • Reproduction: 5 to 7 eggs laid from April to May, hunted by the female for 13 to 14 days. Chicks leave the nest after 12 to 18 days.
  • Distribution: Breeds in coniferous forests. The Finnish breeding population is estimated at 300,000-500,000 pairs. Also visit feeders in winter.
  • Migration: Partially migratory, moves during the day. Fall migrations from October to November, spring migrations from March to May. Migrants overwinter mainly in Russia and Central Europe.
  • Diet: seeds, as well as insects in summer.

Pinicola enucleator

  • Appearance: squat, short-necked bird about the size of a thrush, resembling a large crossbill. The male is reddish-pink, while the female is orange-yellowish. The wings have two clearly visible wing bars. Its tail is long enough.
  • Dimensions: length 19 to 22 centimeters
  • weight 38 to 67 grams.
  • Nest: In a tree, made in a disorderly manner with twigs and stems of dwarfs, lined with roots, straw, reindeer hair, fragments of moss, etc.
  • Reproduction: 4 to 5 eggs laid in May-June, incubated by the female for 13 to 14 days. Chicks leave the nest after 13 to 14 days.
  • Distribution: occurs in the forests of central and southern Finnish Lapland, but often roams the southern coastal regions. The Finnish population is estimated at 5,000-20,000 pairs. It has declined sharply recently.
  • Migration: because it generally moves away from breeding areas during winter, mainly in a southwesterly direction, it is rarely seen in central or southern Finland (although it may be abundant in these areas) years when mountain ash berries are abundant). Autumn migration from October to November, return migration from March to April.
  • Food: seeds, spruce buds, mountain berry seeds in winter.