Turdus viscivorus, what you didn’t know about the Mistle Thrush

The Charlo’s Thrush, whose scientific name is Turdus viscivorus, is a bird of the order Passeriformes and family Turdidae. In terms of taxonomy, molecular studies suggest a greater affinity for species such as T. philomelos or T. mupinensis, rather than T. merula. It is an aggressive, bold, large bird with a wingspan of up to 48 cm, making it the largest European songbird.

Description of Turdus viscivorus

The Mistle Thrush, or Turdus viscivorus, is very cautious and shy. Its color is reminiscent of the great thrush. Its remarkably upright posture also distinguishes it from other thrushes. Its back is uniform grayish-brown. Its rather long tail has white extremities. The inner parts are mostly white, with brownish flanks and light chest, but dotted with round black spots.

During flight, the white underwing coverts and axillary coils are a useful feature. Both sexes have identical plumage. Young birds can be recognized by their more spotted upperparts. The legs are light yellowish brown. Their bill is dark gray with a yellowish base on the lower mandible. The iris is brown.

This is one of the largest thrushes of this species that can be seen in most forests. Immediately call attention to the belly and neck full of black spots on the ventral plumage of pale cream color. With dark eyes and dark bill, the back is grayish-brown and the legs are yellowish-brown. Its silhouette is a little thinner than that of the common melro.

It differs from the rest of the thrushes in the greater clarity and visibility of the ventral points in addition to being somewhat thinner. There do not seem to be major differences between male and female, although they are more evident in young individuals with white spots on the head, in addition to a duller plumage in general.

Characteristics

Thrushes are brightly colored birds, who often like to perch on the ground or perch, with the body erect on legs that are quite long. The song perturbation is large (27 cm long) and stout, with a fairly long tail. The upperparts are grayish brown and the underparts are richly spotted, with a much more upright cape and bushier head than other breeches. It has a powerful flight, with a more regular and prolonged wing-tip.

Immediately catches the attention the colors that it has in the chest and neck full of black spots on the ventral plum of pale cream color. With dark eyes and a dark bill, the back is gray and the legs are yellowish brown. Its silhouette is slightly slimmer than the usual blackbirth.

It differs from the rest of the beliefs in greater clarity and colorfulness of ventral spots in addition to being a little thinner. There do not seem to be major differences between male and female, although they are more evident in young individuals with white spots on the head, as well as a duller feather suit in general.

Its habitat is very varied, usually high in mixed forests, woodlands and coniferous forests. It is also often seen in areas of deforestation and even parks and gardens. It is necessary to have enough trees to be able to install its seeds.

It flies unconsciously with power and speed, closes its wings at regular intervals and follows a straight line. Because it prefers to live in large forests, it has developed a tendency to fly at high altitudes, often more than 30 meters above the ground.

Stays long on the ground, as it goes fast, but at short distances, stops at intervals and looks at the head to investigate any insects or changes. Resting, completely motionless for a few moments, then travels another stretch, this time in a series of quick jumps.When standing on the ground, it stands with its head up and tail down, often touching the ground, as well as wings that also open and hang down.

Habitat

Lives and grows in all types of low-density forests, such as meadows, olive groves, orchards, edges and borders of more closed forests. It prefers clean soils for foraging and consumes worms, insects, seeds and berries. It is a species with a wide Palearctic distribution, reaching Siberia, Central Asia and the foothills of the Himalayas. In Spain, it has a wide pencil distribution, acting as sedentary and incorporating wintering populations in northern Europe. It is a species that is not considered threatened at this time. (see article: (tixagag_16) Lanius Collurio ).

Its habitat is very varied, nesting in mixed forests, woodlands and coniferous forests. It is also frequently seen in deforested areas and even in parks and gardens. It is necessary to have enough trees to be able to install its nests. The chamois feeds mainly on earthworms, worms, insects, seeds and viscus berries. Fruit also appears in its diet.

They build their nest at a very high level, very early, even at the end of February, and some of them can be seen uncovered in the branches of trees. They are built in the form of a cup based on branches and grams.In general, it lays two clutches of four to six eggs from April to June. Incubation is carried out by the female for two weeks and another two weeks will take the hens approximately two weeks to leave the nest while they are fed by both congeners.

Reproduction

Its silhouette is a little thinner than that of the common melro. It differs from the rest of the thrushes in the greater clarity and visibility of the ventral points in addition to being somewhat thinner. There do not seem to be major differences between male and female, although they are more evident in young individuals with white spots on the head, in addition to a duller plumage in general.

Breeding usually starts very early, some years in early February you can already see nests in leafless trees. The female builds a structure mainly with dry grass or green sometimes, together with moss, lichen of various colors, pieces of plastic, papers, feathers, etc. and reinforced with mud, wrapping inside with fine gram.

The edges of this large nest are often well decorated with assorted material that may include ivy seeds, papers, plastics, green leaves, flower petals, etc. Perched high on a horizontal branch and usually on a fork or main trunk of the tree, it is sometimes difficult to observe. They are also found, especially according to nests in June or earlier, on vines and climbers.

They feel a preference for the well-developed Tagus, although they now have little opportunity to use this tree every day more scarce, either by cutting or by transferring the young specimens to private gardens. Nests were also studied inside buildings, in roof beams, in holes in ruined walls and even in rocky stakes, although accessible trees grow in front of them.

The configuration varies from 3 to 5 eggs, most common and almost always 4. 6 and 7 are also mentioned. The variation in the color of the eggs laid by this species is extraordinary. In most dominated by a light greenish-blue hue that sometimes does not occupy the entire surface, but there are many eggs that are frankly very light yellowish-brown and all, and have a lot of brown, brown, purple, etc. spots and blotches.

Although I noticed that some are already ready in February, this is quite exceptional and really live in the Iberian forests will begin to appear in late March and especially in April. The female incubates for 13-14 days and the hens at hatching are covered with a white beige down, dense and quite long; The mouth is bright yellow and has no dark spots on the tongue. Meet the Turquoise Dove .

Both adults feed and are soon covered and feathered, leaving life at 14-16 days and serving through the penis branches only if it is the first link because the female initiates a second start soon.

After 25 days they fly very well. Build the farm at high altitude, very early, even at the end of February, and some of them can be seen uncovered on tree branches. They are built in the form of a cup based on twigs and grass. It usually lays two clutches of about four to six eggs from April to June. Incubation is carried out by the female for two weeks and another two weeks after leaving the farm while they are fed by both kings.

Song

He has a chattering and powerful voice; the music is musical, loud, flute-like and repetitive. The male emits a loud, melodious song from a tree, rooftops or other tall stands, often during bad weather or at night, and starting relatively early in the spring. The music is like a harder, simpler version of the common melro. The alarm call sounds like a rattle or a machine gun.